This week, our first Security Watch (SW) series focuses on Russia’s and China’s successful use of hybrid warfare; the connections between food security, climate change and conflict; Turkey’s drift towards civil war; the problems awaiting a post-ISIS Middle East; and the evolution of seapower theory in China. Then, in our second SW series, we look at the sobering data on China’s environmental crisis; Bangladesh’s battle against violent extremism; the current and future direction of the EU-ASEAN relationship; the myriad roles played UN Secretary Generals – past, present and future; and the evolving status of the conflict in Yemen.

 

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Featured Video

Duration: 35:06
Video by: Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)
Image License: CC | BY

Videos

Asia-Pacific Rebalance 2025: Capabilities, Presence and Partnerships

In today’s video, CSIS analysts unveil the findings of the above report, which assesses the progress the US has made in pivoting towards Asia since 2011. The report's authors conclude that the US will have to intensify its efforts in four key areas if the desired shift is to succeed by 2025. More on «Asia-Pacific Rebalance 2025: Capabilities, Presence and Partnerships »


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9 Feb 2016 Security Watch

An Empty Table? Food-Climate-Conflict Connections in Paris

If you don’t believe in the above links, argue Roger-Mark De Souza and Meaghan Parker, look no further than Syria. A severe drought helped tip a country into civil war. Unfortunately, we’re going to see this type of problem again, particularly when it comes to global food production, prices, and security. More on «An Empty Table? Food-Climate-Conflict Connections in Paris»


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9 Feb 2016 Security Watch

Preventing Violent Extremism Through Inclusive Politics in Bangladesh

Why is the role of Islam in Bangladeshi politics a lightning rod for violence? Geoffrey Macdonald puts the blame on the country’s fractious political culture and the institutionalized repression of Islamic parties. He also thinks it’s time for Dhaka to pursue a politics of inclusion, particularly if it hopes to nip violent extremism in the bud. More on «Preventing Violent Extremism Through Inclusive Politics in Bangladesh»


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9 Feb 2016ISN Blog

Small States Have Options Too: Competitive Strategies Against Aggressors

Small frontline states have had a tough time lately. They have been pushed around by the likes of Russia and China in numerous low-threshold or hybrid ways. But all is not lost, says Thomas Mahnken. Here are four types of competitive strategies small states can use against their larger tormentors. More on «Small States Have Options Too: Competitive Strategies Against Aggressors»


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Jan 2016 Publications

A Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone in Europe: Concept – Problems – Chances

What might a nuclear weapon-free zone look like in Europe and what would it take to create one? Today, Harald Müller and his colleagues clue us in. They identify what should be the zone’s central provisions and how to broaden support for it at the sub-state level. More on «A Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone in Europe: Concept – Problems – Chances»


Global Justice and International Law
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26 Jan 2016 Audio

American Immunity: War Crimes and the Limits of International Law

After World War II, the US painted itself into a corner. It worked to create a robust system of international law and yet resisted compromising its sovereignty when confronted by its own creation. Today, Patrick Hagopian looks at how Washington tried to work around this problem, particularly in the case of suspected war crimes. More on «American Immunity: War Crimes and the Limits of International Law»


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Institute of South Asian Studies (ISAS)

The Institute of South Asian Studies (ISAS) is an autonomous research institute that is part of the National University of Singapore. Its primary aim is to generate knowledge and insights about contemporary South Asia and to disseminate its research in a way that is useful to policymakers, business communities, academia and civil society.

Learn more about ISAS in this ISN interview with Professor Tan Tai Yong, the Institute's Director.

More on «Institute of South Asian Studies (ISAS)»