This week, our hard power-centered Security Watch (SW) series asks what the West’s top security objectives should be in the Middle East; whether South Korea might become one of China’s client-states; whether warfare is indeed becoming more ‘hybrid,’ or ‘political’; what we can learn from the early-modern history of defense-industrial complexes; and whether, in hindsight, the US should have intervened more forcefully in Syria. Then, in our second, more wide-ranging SW series, we look at whether Vladimir Putin’s bellicose foreign policy has undermined the ideological utility of the Russian Orthodox Church; whether unequal land ownership leads to insurgency; what the geopolitical consequences of the Global Financial Crisis have been; whether China is making strategic inroads in Latin America; and whether ex-combatants in the Ivory Coast have been successfully reintegrated into society. 

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Featured Video

Duration: 3:24:17
Video by: Heritage Foundation
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Videos

History Impedes Future Progress in Northeast Asia

In this video, a group of experts and practitioners examine US-Japan-South Korea relations and how they continue to be complicated by the latter two countries' shared pasts. More on «History Impedes Future Progress in Northeast Asia »

Republic of Korea K1 battle tank drives off an amphibious ship
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2 Sep 2014 Security Watch

The Korean Quandary: Defence Reform

What should the US make of South Korea’s latest military procurement decisions? According to Paul Pryce, Washington might worry that Seoul will field smaller forces, become a less reliable ally and increasingly fall under the influence of China. More on «The Korean Quandary: Defence Reform»


 UN Rio Summit, courtesy of  International Rivers
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2 Sep 2014 Security Watch

Land and Conflict in Brazil

Does concentrated land ownership lead to rural conflict and insurgency? Although inequality may seem like a recipe for unrest, Michael Albertus reminds us that there is an important variable to consider – the ability of large landowners to organize themselves and then suppress discontent. More on «Land and Conflict in Brazil»


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2 Sep 2014ISN Blog

China’s Proposed Silk Road

Zhang Hongzhao believes that if China's proposed ‘Silk Road Economic Belt’ is going to succeed, Beijing will first need to ‘connect the dots’ with individual Central Asian states. A grand, multilateral approach, in contrast, is destined to fail, especially in a region where trust is at a premium. More on «China’s Proposed Silk Road»


Human Security, courtesy of the US army
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Jun 2014 Publications

Changing the Game: Human Security as Grand Strategy

Should the concept of human security become a central pillar of US grand strategy? John Anderson believes so. It would help integrate government functions, lay the foundations for greater security and the rule of law, and help preserve American leadership around the globe. More on «Changing the Game: Human Security as Grand Strategy»


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Center for Social and Economic Research (CASE)

The Center for Social and Economic Research (CASE) is an independent, non-profit research institute that provides evidence-based economic and public policy analyses for European stakeholders and and their neighbors. More on «Center for Social and Economic Research (CASE)»