This week, our hard power-centered Security Watch (SW) series wonders what type of threat Argentina poses to the Falkland Islands; whether the West should be cooperating more with Syria’s Bashar al-Assad; whether Canada really needs its four submarines; whether Afghanistan remains the focal point of Central Asian security; and why it’s important for the US Army to manage its complex information systems effectively. Then, in our second, more wide-ranging SW series, we consider whether Malaysia’s diplomatic relations with China are gradually changing; if the Ukraine crisis has indeed ushered in a new era of great-power rivalry; what are the take-aways from Gabrielle Hecht’s study of post-Cold War technopolitics; how economic statecraft and power redistribution fluctuates during wartime; and what the next generation of non-proliferation initiatives might look like.

 More
Search within the section
Help?
Share this Share on Google PlusSubmit to RedditTweet about thisShare on Facebook
Interact CommentPrintPDFMail

Featured Video

Duration: 25:40
Video by: Royal United Services Institute (RUSI)
Image License: CC | BY

Videos

Terrorism and National Security: Proportion or Distortion?

Have Western security services overreacted to the threat posed by global terrorism? Sir Richard Dearlove, who is a former Chief of the British Secret Intelligence Service, believes so. In this video, he explains why too many resources have been devoted to counter- and anti-terrorism activities and not enough on other, more pressing security problems. More on «Terrorism and National Security: Proportion or Distortion?»

Independence day parade in Turkmenistan
Creative Commons - Attribution 2.0 Generic Creative Commons - Attribution 2.0 Generic

24 Jul 2014 Security Watch

The Regional Dimension of Central Asian Security Cooperation

Over the last twelve years, the security dynamics of Central Asia have been dominated by Afghanistan. Not anymore, argues David Erkomaishvili. The region’s security calculations are already being dominated by more traditional ethnic, tribal and sectarian concerns. More on «The Regional Dimension of Central Asian Security Cooperation»


Blowing the Budget
Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic

24 Jul 2014 Security Watch

Another Kind of Victory: Wartime Economic Statecraft

Wars create financial dependencies that powerful creditor nations often exploit. That’s certainly true of the United States, writes Rosella Cappella Zielinski. In World War I and II, it capitalized on Great Britain’s financial vulnerabilities for its own geopolitical gain. More on «Another Kind of Victory: Wartime Economic Statecraft»


$object1.getPropertyValue("IIMAGE_IMAGEALT")
Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic

24 Jul 2014ISN Blog

The Geopolitics of Culture: Five Substrates

What defines a culture? According to Nayef Al-Rodhan, it’s the cognitive structures that shape how people view themselves, relate to the world and react to each other. Fair enough. But how do you then define the geopolitical relevance of culture? To answer that, you first need to consider its five substrates or underpinnings. More on «The Geopolitics of Culture: Five Substrates »


Putin making a face at the EU summit
Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic

Jul 2014 Publications

Putin’s Patriotic Pivot

When Vladimir Putin began his third term in office, his foreign and security agendas were largely unknown. Not anymore, argues Aglaya Snetkov. As the Ukraine crisis illustrates, the agendas are indeed bellicose, anti-Western, and increasingly at odds with Moscow’s partners. More on «Putin’s Patriotic Pivot»


Logo United Nations University (UNU)

Partners

United Nations University (UNU)

The United Nations University (UNU), which the UN General Assembly established in 1973, focuses on resolving macroscopic, global-level problems that directly impact human survival, development and welfare. More on «United Nations University (UNU)»