This week, our hard power-centered Security Watch (SW) series wonders if the US’ littoral combatant ship (LCS) and small surface combatant (SSC) are more survivable than larger combat vessels; how you merge armed rivals into a unified national army at the end of a civil war; whether like-minded organizations will try to follow the template developed by the so-called Islamic State; what the US military’s efforts to combat Ebola in Liberia tells us about the importance of effective security sector reform (SSR); and how did US forces manage to build trust with indigenous stakeholders in Iraq and Afghanistan. Then, in our second, week-long SW series, we give free rein to our soothsaying partners to share their predictions for 2015 and beyond.

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Featured Video

Duration: 1:07:00
Video by: Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)
Image License: CC | BY

Videos

What to Worry About in 2015

In this video, three veteran analysts ruminate on the potential crises and conflicts that might afflict the world in 2015. More on «What to Worry About in 2015»

DRC Soldiers marching, courtesy of Day Donaldson
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27 Jan 2015 Security Watch

Merging Competing Militaries after Civil Wars

Merging competing armed groups into a unified national army has become an important tick box item for ending civil wars. Today, Roy Licklider considers which military integration strategies have been most successful, whether they’ve helped prevent renewed civil strife and much more. More on «Merging Competing Militaries after Civil Wars»


Congolese National Police, courtesy of  MONUSCO Photos
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27 Jan 2015 Security Watch

10 Wars to Watch in 2015

What conflicts have made the International Crisis Group’s list of 10 wars to watch for in 2015? And further, why does our partner organization think that increased global fragmentation might help resolve some of these struggles? Find out here. More on «10 Wars to Watch in 2015»


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27 Jan 2015ISN Blog

Tensions Rise Between India And Pakistan

Military crises between India and Pakistan have historically been kept in check by international pressure and nuclear deterrence. Haifa Peerzada worries, however, that growing tensions along the two nations’ Line of Control and increased media posturing are raising the possibility of all-out war. More on «Tensions Rise Between India And Pakistan»


Soft Exosuit
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Jan 2015 Publications

Between Iron Man and Aqua Man

Should the US Navy invest more in the development of high technology ‘exosuits’ for its shipboard personnel? Andrew Herr and Scott Cheney-Peters believe so, but only if the cost-conscious Navy first identifies the primary purposes for these suits and their required capabilities. More on «Between Iron Man and Aqua Man»


Yemen Revolution
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15 Jan 2015 Audio

Religion, Civil Society, and Legitimacy of the State in the Post-Ottoman Region

The Middle East continues to suffer from severe outbreaks of instability and political violence. In this podcast, Mustafa Aykol examines both the historical reasons behind the region’s troubles and the prospects for increased ‘liberal governance’ in Muslim-majority societies. More on «Religion, Civil Society, and Legitimacy of the State in the Post-Ottoman Region»


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Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent and nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher all rolled into one. More on «Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)»