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Chinese Navy Jiangkai-class frigate Linyi nex to Luhu-class destroyer Qingdao, courtesy Daniel Barker/flickr
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A General Review of the History of China’s Sea-Power Theory Development

12 Feb 2016 Security Watch

According to Senior Captain Zhang Wei, defining the nature of Chinese sea power is critical to the PLA Navy’s success. In his view, China should not repeat the mistakes of “Mahanian fundamentalism,” with its emphasis on the offense and hegemonic control. Instead, the PLA Navy must pursue sea power with Chinese characteristics. More on «A General Review of the History of China’s Sea-Power Theory Development»


Crossroads sign reading
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Yemen on a Road to Nowhere

12 Feb 2016 Security Watch

So, what are the prospects for peace in Yemen? At present, they’re nil, says Charles Schmitz. No one’s interested in a negotiated settlement, the country’s economy is in a tailspin, petty fiefdoms dot the landscape, reform lies murdered by self-interest, and the Saudis just signed a $1 billion arms deal with the US. Good grief. More on «Yemen on a Road to Nowhere»


Dice on a Map, courtesy of  Derek Gavey
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Planning for a Post-Islamic State Middle East

11 Feb 2016 Security Watch

Georgois Barzukas has no doubts. The way the so-called Islamic State’s (IS) ersatz Caliphate is fought, defeated and ultimately replaced will determine the nature and extent of the conflicts that follow. Indeed, local stakeholders in Turkey, Syria and Iraq are already jostling for position in a post-IS Middle East. More on «Planning for a Post-Islamic State Middle East»


Portrait of Ban Ki-moon, courtesy of World Economic Forum/flickr
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Doing “the Most Difficult Job in the World”: The UN Secretary-General in the Past, Present and Future

11 Feb 2016 Security Watch

The UN Secretary-General’s post and the politics surrounding it receive little analysis. What, exactly, does the role entail? Who will succeed Ban Ki-moon? Will the selection process be fair, or should the 10 reforms advocated by the “1 for 7 Billion” campaign first be enacted? Today, Emma Dwight delves into these questions and others. More on «Doing “the Most Difficult Job in the World”: The UN Secretary-General in the Past, Present and Future »