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Today’s Revolutions in Military Affairs

MIM-104 Patriot Missile, courtesy of US Army Korea - IMCOM/flickr
Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 Generic Creative Commons - Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 Generic

An MIM-104 Patriot Missile

When thinking about the latest Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA), two questions come to mind. First, is it still a viable conceptual framework to guide the planned use of force? Second, has it influenced non-Western ways of using force, especially in a “post-heroic” era of warfare?



Our Most Recent Revolution in Military Affairs – A Thumbnail Historical Sketch

08 Apr 2013 / Special Feature

The current RMA is no spring chicken, argues the ISN’s Peter Faber. It’s cultural and conceptual foundations go back at least 100 years, involve breaking away from a long-standing American Way of War and have been fought over, in terms of its future direction, by brass knuckled bureaucratic factions. More on «Our Most Recent Revolution in Military Affairs – A Thumbnail Historical Sketch»


Harmony & Chaos: The Principles of China’s Unrestricted Warfare

09 Apr 2013 / Special Feature

Like other military experts, Carson Thomas Checketts believes that Qiao Liang’s and Wang Xiangsui’s “Unrestricted Warfare” helps explain how Beijing views ‘combat’ in the 21st century. Today, he outlines the principles laid out in this head-turning text and what it means for US military strategy. More on «Harmony & Chaos: The Principles of China’s Unrestricted Warfare »


The United States and the RMA Today

10 Apr 2013 / Special Feature

How much has the United States embraced the late-20th century Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA)? And how might this particular RMA impact the conduct of war over the coming decades? In attempting to answer these questions, Barry Watts offers a short but honest answer – it depends. More on «The United States and the RMA Today»


China and the RMA Today

11 Apr 2013 / Special Feature

When it comes to political and military strategy, Manabrata Guha believes China is a careful and context-dependent planner. Instead of copying Western versions of the Revolution in Military Affairs, Beijing is developing strategic-military asymmetries that suit its particular needs. More on «China and the RMA Today»


The Revolution in Military Affairs: 12 Observations on an Out-of-Fashion Idea

12 Apr 2013 / Special Feature

As a doctrine-guiding concept, has the RMA played itself out? Scott Stephenson believes so. He is also quick to point out, however, that some of the deep-structure principles that prop up the RMA still have value for those who have to deal with today’s security problems. More on «The Revolution in Military Affairs: 12 Observations on an Out-of-Fashion Idea»



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